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400 Popular Idiomatic Expressions, Meanings, Types and Examples

What is an Idiomatic Expression?

An idiom is a statement or expression whose meaning does not correspond to the literal meaning of its words. In other words, “idioms have distinct meanings than individual words.” Idioms and proverbs are frequently confused by people. However, these are not the same thing.

Proverbs are well-known for expressing advice or broad facts. For example, the proverb “a picture is worth a thousand words” is a universal fact. Consider the idiom “bite off more than you can chew.” You meant that you are attempting to achieve something too difficult for you. Read on to learn about 400 useful and frequently used idioms, examples, and definitions.

Types of Idiomatic Expressions

There are several types of idiomatic expressions, including:

  1. Literal idioms – these are expressions where the meaning can be understood based on the literal interpretation of the words. For example, “a cat nap” means a short sleep, and “rain cats and dogs” means heavy rain.
  2. Figurative idioms – these are expressions where the meaning is not literal and must be inferred based on the context. For example, “break a leg” means good luck, and “let the cat out of the bag” means to reveal a secret.
  3. Colloquial idioms – these are expressions that are specific to a particular region or culture and are often informal. For example, “hang tight” means to wait patiently, and “beat feet” means to leave quickly.
  4. Proverbial idioms – these are expressions that convey a general truth or wisdom. For example, “practice makes perfect” means that if you do something enough times, you will become good at it.
  5. Slang idioms – these are expressions that are informal and often used by younger people or in specific subcultures. For example, “sick” means cool or awesome, and “lit” means exciting or fun.
  6. Compound idioms – these are expressions that combine two or more idioms to create a new meaning. For example, “put your best foot forward” and “bite the bullet” combined become “bite the bullet and put your best foot forward,” meaning to face a difficult situation with determination and effort.

Idioms and meanings

Idiomatic Expressions and Their Meanings With Examples

1. In for a penny, in for a pound.

Meaning: A purposeful investment of time or money in a specific endeavor or task.

Example: When crypto was thriving, Jim was in it for a penny and in it for a pound; that’s how passionate he was.

2. A bird in the hand is better than two in the bush.

Meaning: A current chance is preferable to a prospect since time never repeats itself.

Example: The detective arrested three offenders and noticed another fleeing but did not pursue him because she understood that a bird in one hand is worth two in the bush.

3. Chip off the old block

Meaning: A person’s behavior or deeds are similar to those of his parents.

Example: When grandmother noticed her grandson accumulating pennies like her son, she recognized him as a Chip off the old block.

4. Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.

Meaning: Treat others as you would like to be treated.

Example: I thought Peter was cold today towards the homeless man; he should do unto others as he would have them do unto him because no one knows tomorrow.

5. Don’t cry over spilt milk.

Meaning: Don’t cry about what happened because it can’t be changed.

Example: Jane failed her exam, but her mother walked over and told her, “My daughter, don’t cry over spilt milk.”

6. Every cloud has a silver lining.

Meaning: Things that go wrong eventually go right.

Example: You were depressed yesterday because your phone was stolen, but look at you today: you have been gifted a brand new phone. It is correct to say that every cloud has a silver lining.

7. Beside yourself with joy

Meaning: To be immensely pleased.

Example: Congratulations on getting chosen for the position. It feels great to see you beside yourself with joy.

8. Fair and square

Meaning: Being straightforward or fair.

Example: To tell you fair and square, I did everything I was supposed to, but I still feel dissatisfied.

9. Having an Ace up the sleeve

Meaning: Have an edge that is being held back for future use.

Example: Ada remained silent during the board meeting, unaware she had an Ace in his sleeve the entire time.

10. A black sheep

Meaning: Being an embarrassment to the family.

Example: No one invites George to the meetings anymore because it turns out he was the family’s black sheep, marrying someone else despite still being engaged to his fiancée.

11. Hook, line and sinker

Meaning: Doing or attempting to do something thoroughly and passionately.

Example: I have set a goal of going through the spreadsheets by Monday, and I am working towards it Hook, line, and sinker.

12. Looking to your laurels

Meaning: Not getting caught up in your accomplishments and losing sight of what is supposed to happen.

Example: His Dad advised him to look to his laurels but not to sit on them.

13. Bear a grudge

Meaning: To remain angry or hostile toward someone or something because of a previous occurrence.

Example: I Bear a grudge against her for taking me for granted.

14. By the skin of your teeth

Meaning: To barely scrape by or make it.

Example: John was chosen for the dancing team. The audition gates were about to close by the skin of his teeth.

15. Down for the count

Meaning: I am tired; I am giving up.

Example: My dog is out for the count after a full day of frisbee play.

16. Draw the line

Meaning: To come to a halt before something acceptable becomes unacceptable.

Example: That’s enough, buddy. Draw the line before someone comes after you and beats you up.

17. Easier said than done

Meaning: It is not as simple as it appears.

Example: Passing the test is easier said than done. More than half of the class fails it yearly.

18. Break a leg

Meaning: Wishing someone good luck.

Example: Break a leg, Jane; it’s time for you to take the stage and deliver your speech.

19. Up a creek without a paddle

Meaning: In an unfortunate scenario.

Example: The thief attempted to scale the fence but was stopped by the watch night men; assume he was up a creek without a paddle yesterday.

20. Give it a whirl

Meaning: To experiment with something.

Example: I am frightened of swimming, but  I am thinking about giving it a whirl once in my life.

21. Fish out of water

Meaning: to step outside of one’s comfort zone

Example: When his fiancée took him to a Star Wars conference in Los Angeles, Adrian felt like a fish out of the sea.

22. In the fast lane

Meaning: A life full of adventure.

Example: Chris turned forty and chose to live his life in the fast lane, quitting his job to pursue his passions.

23. Go the extra mile

Meaning: to go the additional mile

Example: He was eager to go the additional mile for Mia, his true love.

24. Snug as a bug in a rug

Meaning: Warm and inviting.

Meaning: Next to her mother, the baby appears to be as snug as a bug in a rug.

25. Step up your game

Meaning: to begin improving performance.

Example: Jane needs to step up her game if she wants to establish a name for herself in football.

26. To not see the wood for the trees.

Meaning: To be so preoccupied with petty concerns that you miss important information.

Example: She always complains over the dumbest issues, as if she can’t see the forest for the trees.

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27. Lose your marbles

Meaning: To lose one’s mind.

Example: Every day, our postman delivers Mrs Arnold’s mail at our front door. It seems like he has lost his marbles.

28. Straight from the Horse’s mouth

Meaning: Straight from the source.

Example: Hear it from the horse’s mouth: he was killed right in front of his children

29. Crying Wolf

Meaning: To request assistance when you do not require it.

Example: Nobody believes you now because you have cried Wolf many times.

30. Palm off

Meaning: Pass something off as authentic when it is not.

Example: This retailer always palms off expired stock to his consumers.

31. Has bigger fish to fry

Meaning: Has more essential tasks to complete.

Example: Do not contact me for the job anymore; I have bigger fish to fry.

32. Look before you leap.

Meaning: Before moving forward with an option, weigh the hazards.

Example: Look before you leap; you cannot just sell all your belongings because he promised to relocate you to the United Kingdom.

33. On thin ice

Meaning: In a complex or unsafe circumstance.

Example: Andy missed work for a week because he was sick, and now his employer says he is on very thin ice.

34. Play devil’s advocate

Meaning: To argue only for the purpose of discussing.

Example: He refused to back down as if he were the devil’s advocate.

35. Rain on someone’s parade

Meaning: To ruin a moment.

Example: He apologized to his wife for ruining her parade, but they had to change their travel dates.

36. Take a rain check

Meaning: Change a plan.

Example: He invited me to supper with his family, but I had a prior commitment, so I asked him to take a rain check.

37. Take it with a grain of salt

Meaning: Take it lightly.

Example: She recounts fantastic stories, but we take everything she says with a grain of salt.

38. Like a cakewalk

Meaning: So simple a task.

Example: Everyone else spent hours writing the code, but Shane did it like a catwalk.  59.

39. Throw caution to the wind

Meaning: Take a risk.

Example: The caretaker threw caution to the wind by taking a sick baby outside.

40. Penny wise and Pound foolish.

Meaning: Cautious in minor affairs while, insignificant matters, being lavish or expensive.

Example: Abu drinks garri every day for dinner, yet he is prepared to lavish on girls. He is, indeed, penny wise and pounds foolish.

41. The whole nine yards

Meaning: Everything, from start to finish.

Example: I would like to know everything about that boy you are dating, the whole nine yards.

42. The best thing since sliced bread

Meaning: A fantastic invention.

Example: Going out today is the best thing since sliced bread.

43. Bite off more than you can chew

Meaning: Accept a demanding task that is above your abilities.

Example: Andrew promised his boss that he would triple sales, but in truth, he bit off more than he could chew, and now he is on the company’s sack list.

44. Play by the ear

Meaning: To be creative.

Example: I stayed in Abuja for two years by the ear, without knowing my way around the city.

45. Ignorance is bliss

Meaning: Some things are better left unknown.

Example: His wife had long wondered what he did late at night, and it came out he was an armed robber. But because she was unaware of this, she will not be convicted; sometimes, ignorance is bliss.

46. Put something on ice.

Meaning: To postpone anything.

Example: John has put his wedding plans on ice under his father’s order.

47. You can say that again

Meaning: That is entirely correct.

Example: “Messi is the best player in the world” you can say that again, Amin.

48. Bite the bullet

Meaning: To get something done because it is unavoidable.

Example: James had an accident that affected his left leg badly. He doesn’t want it amputated, but his wife’s will he bit the bullet.

49. Go back to the drawing board.

Meaning: Restart the process.

Example: I made her understand it is not too late to return to the drawing board and correct her errors.

50. Call it a day

Meaning: Stop what you’re doing.

Example: Since we cannot finish the topic today, we call it a day and resume tomorrow.

51. Beating Around the Bush

Meaning: To discuss trivial matters.

Example: When I inquired about how the money was spent, my supervisor beat about the bush.

52. Be in a tight corner.

Meaning: Being in a challenging circumstance.

Example: Sarah’s poor health, despite the doctor’s efforts, Sarah’s poor health has left her in a tight corner.

53. At the 11th hour

Meaning: At the last second.

Example: James left for Real Madrid at the eleventh hour, leaving behind all the memories he had created with his teammates at Chelsea.

54. Swan Song

Meaning: An artist’s final effort before dying.

Example: The recording was Mr Azang’s swang song.

55. Wild Goose Chase

Meaning: Ineffective Pursuit

Example: Attempting to catch the two criminals on a congested road was a wild goose chase for the cop.

56. Bury the hatchet

Meaning: Putting an end to a fight to make peace.

Example: My uncle buried the hatchet by dividing the land evenly between my brother and me.

57. To bell the Cat

Meaning: To take a chance.

Example: When he was attempting to escape from the prison, he belled the cat.

58. Turn a deaf ear

Meaning: To disregard what someone says.

Example: Anu turned a deaf ear when her mother protested about her frequent cellphone use.

59. At Sea

Meaning: Confused

Example: I was at sea while shopping for a dinner gown for my girlfriend’s reunion party.

60. To be in the doldrums

Meaning: to be in a bad mood

Example: I was in the doldrums when I learned about the death of Yinka’s mother.

61. Hit the books

Meaning: Going to school

Example: He said he wouldn’t be able to attend lunch since he has to hit the books for his bar exams.

62. Twist someone’s arm

Meaning: To persuade someone

Example: I had no intention of attending the party, but you twisted my arm by promising me all the excellent moments

63. Stab someone in the back

Meaning: To betray a close person

Example: My uncle had so much faith in his driver, but when he saw all the money bags, he stabbed him in the back.

64. Go cold turkey

Meaning: To abstain from or stop engaging in addictive or harmful behavior

Example: No one could believe my father had gone out to consume chocolates! When the physicians told him he had diabetes, he quit cold turkey.

65. Ring a bell

Meaning: That sounds familiar.

Example: This scene rings a bell in my head. Is it from Lord of the rings?

66. Cut to the chase

Meaning: Get to the subject.

Example: Because the submissions were due tonight, the boss cut to the chase and instructed us to get to work.

67. Blow off steam

Meaning: Having solid emotions such as rage or stress

Example: Kate left the room to blow off the steam after a heated argument with her neighbour.

68. Face the music

Meaning: Face the facts

Example: Grace advised her husband not to run away from the problem but to face the music.

69. To have sticky fingers

Meaning: Thief

Example: The accountant had a sticky finger and stole roughly $3000 before fleeing the organisation.

70. Break the bank

Meaning: To be prohibitively expensive

Example: I had to break the bank to get these clothes.

80. It is always darkest before the dawn

Meaning: Things will improve.

Example: He has been through many things, but I advised him to remember that it is always dark before dawn.

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81. Jump the gun

Meaning: To take action before the appropriate time

Example: I believe I jumped the gun by announcing the tournament winner before it was time for the announcement.

82. Wear your heart on your sleeve

Meaning: Too boldly expressing yourself

Example: She wears her heart on her sleeve and frequently gets hurt.

83. Cut no ice

Meaning: Failure to make an impression

Example: Your poem does not cut any ice with me.

84. Light at the end of the tunnel

Meaning: Future indications of progress

Example: Despite the struggles, I can see the light at the end of the tunnel.

85. Through thick and thin

Meaning: In both good and bad times

Example: Shade and Boye have been good companions through thick and thin.

86. Cry for the moon

Meaning: To request something challenging to obtain.

Example: You cry for the moon for a football game ticket.

87. Read between the lines.

Meaning: Understanding the true meaning of something.

Example: If you read between the lines, you will realise that her song is about her love life.

88. Pour out one’s heart

Meaning: To freely express oneself

Example: I cannot pour my heart out to you if you are too preoccupied with your surroundings.

89. A left-handed compliment

Meaning: Saying anything nasty in the guise of gratitude.

Example: His comments on my success seemed more like a left-handed compliment

90. Once in a blue moon

Meaning: Not too often.

Example: I go to watch the games once in a blue moon.

91. Call a spade a spade

Meaning: To be completely honest

Example: I will not lie about it; let us call a spade a spade.

92. Flesh and blood

Meaning: Referring to a family member or human nature
Example: It is flesh and blood to have a panic attack at every little incidence.

93. Jam on the brakes

Meaning: Suddenly, apply the brakes to a vehicle.

Example: I had to slam the brakes when I noticed the deer.

94. Notch up

Meaning: To win or set a new record

Example: With their incredible vocals, Face-two notched up the finals.

95. A slap on the wrist

Meaning: It was only minor punishment.

Example: You will get slapped on the wrist for painting this wall, but don’t try it again.

96. Knee Jerk Reaction

Meaning: A prompt answer.

Example: The attitude was just a reflex reaction.

97. Once bitten, twice shy

Meaning: Fear of doing something new

Example: Once bitten twice shy, he really cannot dance.

98. Forty winks

Meaning: A quick nap

Example: I guarantee I will only be in for forty winks.

99. Up for grabs

Meaning: Everyone has access to it.

Example: This sharwama slice is up for grapes at a fair price.

100. Old as the hills

Meaning: Someone quite old

Example: The man appears to be as old as the hills.

101. Back to square one

Meaning: Begin anew

Example: We are back to square one because of your error.

102. Round the bend

Meaning: Crazy

Example: Do not meddle with my next-door neighbor; she is round the bend.

103. Against the clock

Meaning: Rushed

Example: I had to rush for the ceremony since I was moving against the clock.

104. Black and blue

Meaning: Something swollen

Example: What happened to John? His eyes looked black and blue.

105. Have the blues

Meaning: Sad

Example: He felt the blues after meeting with her.

106. Be glad to see the back of

Meaning: Happy when someone departs

Example: He made her understand that the organisation would be glad to see her back of her before the end of next month.

107. Blackout

Meaning: Faint

Example: He blacked out after taking the second bottle

108. Get in Shape

Meaning: To gain strength or fitness

Example: I must create a proper schedule to get in shape for the graduation ceremony.

109. Shoot from the hip

Meaning: To talk rashly or openly without serious consideration

Example: You should not feel awful about what he said. He has a penchant for shooting from the hip, but he is not malicious.

110. Shoot oneself in the foot

Meaning: Inadvertently harming one’s cause

Example: He shot himself in the foot by telling the interviewer about the other applicants for the desired job.

111. In cold blood

Meaning: If you commit a violent and cruel act in cold blood, you do so on purpose and without emotion.

Example: His family was murdered in cold blood.

112. Draw first blood

Meaning: When you draw first blood, you inflict the most harm on an opponent in a conflict or contest.

Example: Being the first to gain an advantage or score against a competitor. I won the tournament by drawing first blood and quickly dispatching my opponent.

Other Idiomatic Expressions and Their Meanings are;

  • A bird’s eye view – a view from above or a broad overview
  • A chip on one’s shoulder – a confrontational attitude
  • A dime a dozen – something common and of little value
  • A drop in the bucket – a small or insignificant amount
  • A flash in the pan – something that shows promise but ultimately fails
  • A hard nut to crack – a difficult problem to solve
  • A kick in the pants – a motivator or something that inspires action
  • A needle in a haystack – something that is hard to find
  • A bad egg – a person with bad intentions or behavior
  • A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush – it’s better to have something for sure than to risk losing it for something better that may not come
  • A blessing in disguise – something that initially seems bad but actually turns out to be good
  • A dime a dozen – something that is common and of little value
  • A flash in the pan – something that initially looks promising but ultimately fails
  • A game of cat and mouse – a situation where two parties try to outsmart each other
  • A hard pill to swallow – a difficult truth to accept
  • A house divided against itself cannot stand – a group that is divided cannot be successful
  • A leopard can’t change its spots – a person cannot change who they are at their core
  • A penny for your thoughts – a request for someone to share their thoughts or feelings
  • A picture is worth a thousand words – a visual representation can convey more information than words alone
  • A piece of my mind – an honest and often critical opinion
  • A watched pot never boils – time seems to move slower when we are impatiently waiting for something
  • Actions speak louder than words – what someone does is more important than what they say
  • Add insult to injury – to make a bad situation worse
  • All dressed up and nowhere to go – to be prepared for something that ultimately doesn’t happen
  • All ears – fully attentive and listening carefully
  • All in the same boat – in the same difficult situation
  • All thumbs – awkward or clumsy with one’s hands
  • An arm and a leg – very expensive
  • As easy as ABC – very easy
  • As easy as pie – very easy
  • As fit as a fiddle – in excellent physical condition
  • As good as gold – very well-behaved or dependable
  • As mad as a hatter – crazy or insane
  • As proud as a peacock – very proud or boastful
  • At the drop of a hat – immediately, without hesitation
  • Back to square one – starting over again from the beginning
  • Back to the drawing board – starting over again from scratch
  • Barking up the wrong tree – pursuing the wrong idea or person
  • Beat around the bush – to avoid speaking directly or honestly about something
  • Beauty is in the eye of the beholder – people have different opinions and tastes about what is beautiful
  • Bite off more than you can chew – to take on more responsibility than one can handle
  • Bite the bullet – to face a difficult situation with courage and determination
  • Break a leg – good luck
  • Burn the midnight oil – to work late into the night
  • By hook or by crook – by any means necessary, regardless of how it is done
  • By the book – following rules and procedures strictly
  • Can’t judge a book by its cover – appearances can be deceiving
  • Can’t make an omelet without breaking eggs – sometimes sacrifices must be made to achieve something
  • Can’t see the forest for the trees – too focused on the small details to see the big picture
  • Caught between a rock and a hard place – in a difficult or impossible situation
  • Change of heart – a change in one’s opinion or feelings
  • Chew the fat – to chat or talk casually
  • Clean as a whistle – completely clean or pure
  • Clear as mud – unclear or confusing
  • A piece of cake – something that is very easy
  • A penny for your thoughts – a request for someone to share their thoughts or feelings
  • A snake in the grass – a treacherous or deceitful person
  • A storm in a teacup – a minor problem that has been blown out of proportion
  • Actions speak louder than words – what someone does is more important than what they say
  • All ears – fully attentive and listening carefully
  • All thumbs – awkward or clumsy with one’s hands
  • Apple of my eye – something or someone that is cherished or loved
  • At the drop of a hat – immediately, without hesitation
  • Back to square one – starting over again from the beginning
  • Barking up the wrong tree – pursuing the wrong idea or person
  • Beat around the bush – to avoid speaking directly or honestly about something
  • Bite the bullet – to face a difficult situation with courage and determination
  • Break a leg – good luck
  • Burning the candle at both ends – overworking oneself
  • By the book – following rules and procedures strictly
  • By the skin of one’s teeth – barely making it or succeeding
  • Can’t judge a book by its cover – appearances can be deceiving
  • Can’t make an omelet without breaking eggs – sometimes sacrifices must be made to achieve something
  • Cold turkey – quitting something abruptly and completely
  • Costs an arm and a leg – very expensive
  • Cross that bridge when you come to it – deal with a problem when it happens and not worry about it beforehand
  • Cry over spilled milk – to regret something that has already happened and can’t be changed
  • Cut corners – to take shortcuts or do something poorly in order to save time or money
  • Devil’s advocate – someone who takes the opposite side of an argument to stimulate debate or thought
  • Don’t cry wolf – don’t make false alarms or exaggerate a problem
  • Don’t judge a man until you have walked a mile in his shoes – don’t judge someone until you have experienced what they have experienced
  • Drop a bombshell – to reveal a surprising or shocking news or fact
  • Eat one’s words – to admit that something one said was wrong
  • Egg on one’s face – to be embarrassed or humiliated by one’s actions or words
  • Every cloud has a silver lining – there is always something positive that can come out of a negative situation
  • Fish out of water – someone who feels out of place or uncomfortable in a situation
  • A piece of cake – something that is very easy
  • Actions speak louder than words – what you do is more important than what you say
  • Add fuel to the fire – to make a bad situation worse
  • All ears – fully attentive and listening carefully
  • All thumbs – awkward or clumsy with one’s hands
  • An arm and a leg – very expensive
  • As cool as a cucumber – calm and composed
  • As easy as pie – very easy
  • At the drop of a hat – immediately, without hesitation
  • Back to the drawing board – starting over again from scratch
  • Barking up the wrong tree – pursuing the wrong idea or person
  • Beat around the bush – to avoid speaking directly or honestly about something
  • Bite the bullet – to face a difficult situation with courage and determination
  • Break a leg – good luck
  • Burn the midnight oil – to work late into the night
  • By the book – following rules and procedures strictly
  • Call it a day – to stop working for the day
  • Catch someone’s eye – to get someone’s attention
  • Caught between a rock and a hard place – in a difficult or impossible situation
  • Change of heart – a change in one’s opinion or feelings
  • Chew the fat – to chat or talk casually
  • Close but no cigar – almost but not quite successful
  • Cold feet – to be afraid or hesitant to do something
  • Cut corners – to do something in a cheap or easy way, sacrificing quality
  • Cut the mustard – to meet expectations or perform well
  • Devil’s advocate – someone who argues against an idea to test its validity
  • Don’t count your chickens before they hatch – don’t assume something will happen before it actually does
  • Drop a bombshell – to reveal surprising or shocking news
  • Eat crow – to admit a mistake and apologize
  • Every cloud has a silver lining – even in a difficult situation, there is always something positive to be found
  • Face the music – to accept the consequences of one’s actions
  • Feel under the weather – to feel sick or unwell
  • Fit as a fiddle – in excellent physical condition
  • Full of beans – energetic and lively
  • Get a kick out of something – to enjoy something very much
  • Get cold feet – to become afraid or hesitant to do something
  • Get the ball rolling – to start something
  • Give someone the cold shoulder – to intentionally ignore or avoid someone
  • Go the extra mile – to put in extra effort beyond what is expected
  • Good as gold – very well-behaved or dependable
  • Grass is always greener on the other side – people tend to believe that what others have is better than what they have themselves
  • Happy-go-lucky – carefree and lighthearted
  • Hit the nail on the head – to identify something correctly or accurately
  • In the bag – a certainty, something that is sure to happen
  • In the doghouse – in trouble or disfavored
  • It’s a small world – the world can seem small when people unexpectedly cross paths
  • It’s not rocket science – something is not difficult to understand or do
  • Jump the gun – to do something prematurely or before it is appropriate
  • Keep one’s chin up – to stay positive and optimistic in difficult situations
  • Keep the ball rolling – to maintain progress or momentum
  • For crying out loud – an expression of frustration or annoyance
  • Get a taste of your own medicine – to experience what one has inflicted on others
  • Get off someone’s back – to stop criticizing or harassing someone
  • Give someone the cold shoulder – to ignore or snub someone
  • Go the extra mile – to put in extra effort or do more than is expected
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English phrases, proverbs, and idioms play a significant part in written and spoken English. People should be familiar with the meaning of idioms and how to apply them because they do not always make literal sense. Although this appears to be a lot of work, idioms are enjoyable! It is sometimes referred to as a more native method of speaking; therefore, mastering some of these idioms is beneficial.